The New Moon of August 2017: reflecting on Beijing

Beijing's ancient observatory is right in the middle of the city. Click the pic to go to link.
Beijing's ancient observatory is right in the middle of the city. Click the pic to go to link.

 

There is a new moon on 21st/22nd of August 2017 at 29 degrees of Leo. Much has been made of the full solar eclipse happening on the same day, a rare event which has been dubbed The Great American Eclipse  as the path of eclipse is at it's fullest as it crosses the mainland states, or has already crossed as I write this.

 

 

What is more interesting is the focus that this new moon/eclipse brings to Beijing. Undubitably Beijing is the new Rome. Or the new Old Beijing, a resurrection of its old power in the world. Beijing is one of the oldest inhabited regions on earth. The city has be built, destroyed, or let to ruin and rebuilt many times. The current city is a vast metropolis, most of which has be built in the last 25 years. Even so, many ancient sites remain and the ancient geomantic layout is still visible.

 

I spent 6 weeks in Beijing in 1987. I was on my way from Tianjin to Europe and had thought I would only need a few days to look around before boarding the Trans-Manchurian train across the USSR. There were ticket and visa problems, and they took a month to sort out. I hired a bicycle and visited every tourist site listed in my guidebook, right down to the bottom of the list which ended with the Marco Polo bridge.

 

The Marco Polo bridge was at that time located in a village outside city limits. I had a pleasant ride through green fields, by this time off the edges of the tourist map, until I came to a new multi-lane, highway without traffic. I turned right on it which luckily turned out to be correct and continued until I could wave down another cyclist; the "traffic" consisting of a few well-spaced cyclists and the occasional horse drawn cart, From her I got directions and continued to the turn off, swinging left down a hill and through a tiny, leafy hamlet with laundry hanging outside bare brick houses, chickens running around and lunch being cooked outside on small  braziers.  I arrived at the impressive gate where there were a few tour groups and souvenir stalls, the bridge being on the other side. Unfortunately, given the heat of July, the river under the bridge had been diverted for engineering works further back upstream and the river bed was dry and dusty. Nevermind, the bridge itself was interesting enough.

 

All this is now well inside in suburban Beijing; the basic concrete shoebox hotel I stayed in having long gone and the route I took difficult to make out. I think I was staying somewhere near the southern railway station.

 

So the city grows and grows and its importance grows with it in the 21st century. Robert Coon, the mystic whose book Earth Chakras examines planetary energies from whole different point of view than most  people are familiar with, assigns a great deal of importance to this Leo new moon and its relationship to Beijing. Beijing has an increasingly influential role to play in world affairs and this growth is visibly in progress between the years 2008-2027.  On any August new moon, Coon suggests incorporating Beijing into one's meditations or other vibration lifting activities; "If you don't have a photo, try to imagine, or visualise, the area of the world you are concentrating on. Above all, try to enjoy what you are doing during these "link-up" times." So we could send some positive vibes to Beijing and it's leaders this week, they could probably use it. One could head out to Chinatown and enjoy a bang-up meal or bust out the best brocade cushion covers at home.  Useful too to ignore the baying and braying of the mainstream media and read some history about the city, it is fascinating. The official tourist bureau has a good site, a bit light on illustration but plenty of information.